The latest average dam level for the Western Cape is 53.55% (2019: 49.55%). The dams providing water to the City of Cape Town, are combined, 71.8% full but the situation in the Karoo and upper West Coast remains serious.

Anton Bredell, the minister of Local Government, Environmental Affairs and Development Planning in the Western Cape, says it is heartening to see major dams like the Theewaterskloof Dam – the largest in the province – at a level above 64%.

“Only two years ago, the dam was rapidly emptying and standing at 13.9%. In January 2018 the Western Cape, as a whole, had an average dam level of 25% and worse was yet to come. The drought for the biggest part of the province only really broke in the winter season when we got some early rainfall.”

Bredell says the province continues to monitor and support areas where the drought continues.

“In addition we want to urge consumers to continue to use water sparingly. We are already looking ahead to the 2020/2021 summer season and we want to ask that people continue to reduce water usage where possible and report leaks and problems to local authorities as fast as possible. We are already engaging our local authorities in the Western Cape to look at their networks ahead of the winter season. This includes looking at storm water drainage systems and implementing necessary maintenance on the water networks where needed. By planning ahead and working together, we can stay in front of possible challenges,” says Bredell.

Major Dam statistics

Voëlvlei dam – 74.6% full this week (2018: 78.4%. Last week: 76.8%)

Bergriver Dam 86.3% full this week (2018: 85.1%. Last week: 87.8%).

Theewaterskloof dam – 64.3% full this week (2018: 47.4%. Last week: 64.3%)

Clanwilliam Dam 52.7%. (2018: 57.6%. Last week: 56.4%)

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